Some many unfinished projects

This year I really hoped that I could limit myself to one or two projects at a time. However, that was not going to happen!

Right now, I am in the middle of a series of unfinished projects that does not feel that fun right now.

1940 – Grandmas heart open heart sweater

This one have I been working on for some time now. I started back in late January. So far, I’ve knitted the back, two fronts and half a sleeve. I am almost there. Only a couple of movies away from a finished sweater. Nevertheless, the spring and summer has come and my need for knitting have disappeared. I call this my grandma sweater because the pattern is from an old magazine she bought back in 1940. My mom informed me after starting the project that my grandmother also had made this sweater. So exiting. I would love to finish soon a show my grandfather (now 94 years old) it.

 

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1899 – Sophies Jacket

I bought the pattern for this jacket back in January from Lauren at Wearing History. I had some wool fabric in my stash, so the only thing I needed was to get starting. I made the mockup a while ago, and put the project away for ones that are more urgent. However, one day I just fell like sewing this jacket, and started. I am now finished with the main construction. All I need is to make buttonholes, fasten some lining and decorate it with trims. I am half way through this project and hope to finish soon.

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See Pattern here

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1915 – Suit a long

Lauren at Wearing History have made a sew-along for a 1915s suit. You can follow this on Facebook. I am participating in this. I bought the fabric, printed the pattern and found my inspiration.  All I need is time to start making it… and a 1910’s corset. Oh my!

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See pattern hereminna-metervare__72251_PE188002_S4 minna-metervare__0110999_PE261633_S4

1870’s – Bustle dress

I have also joined a paid class with Jenifer from Historical sewing. This is quite stupid, because it is in my exam period, which starts in a few days. But the patterns a bought. The fabric samples coming and the inspiration for dress is there. I NEED TIME!

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I plan too much, and have too little time

So! This week I have a free week between lectures and exams. Therefore will I try to fill my blog with a lot of new and exciting stuff. The blog have seemed a bit silent recently, but that do not reflect what I have been doing. Right now, am I working on multiple projects. However, I will tell more about them tomorrow in their own post.
This weekend did a participate in my first WW2 event called Bunker By Night. I was a part of the historical reenactment group called Danforce/The Danish Brigade in Sweden. Here i wore a completely new dress sewn from the 1940’s pattern bought back in January together with the fabric. This is also a HSF challenge. So I will be making two separate posts. One for my new 1940 dress, and one for the Danforce reenactment group.. You can see some pictures at the Facebook side. Link should be to the right —>

And just to make this post more fun. I received my orders from India today! Three sarees and one pair of shoes. The sarees is made of 100 % cotton. One of them is a bit modern with sequins. Nevertheless, I think I will just remove that. I hope that these will turn out to be some lovely regency dresses. The shoes will make some nice 18th century shoes when covered in silk and decorated.

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Please Help Save Foundations Revealed and Your Wardrobe Unlock’d!

Please help this wonderfull communitiy!

Threading Through Time

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How good is this treasure trove of knowledge? Check out a few of the free articles for a taste of what awaits. “Foundation” covers more than just corset making. “Wardrobe” takes you through a huge variety of historical styles and fashions.

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HSF #7/2014 – Tops & Toes

The Challenge: Tops & Toes

What is it: 15th century liripipe

Fabric: Wool and linen

Pattern: Own pattern, with inspiration from the Herjolfsnæs liripipes

Year: 15th century

Notions: Linen and wool thread for decoration and sewing.

How historically accurate is it? It is completely handsewn. Made with the techniques described in Else Østergaards – Woven to the Earth. The buttons is a copy of an extant fabric button.

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Funeral doublet of Pandolfo III Malatesta (1370-1427). 

Source: link

Hours to complete: A lot! Didn’t count them because of the long time frame it took to finish it in.

First worn: Not yet.

Total cost: All in stash.

 

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REMEMBER! Tomorrow I will announce the winner of the give-away. Go to this post to participate! LINK

HSF #6/2014 – Fairytale

Late as always! And full of bad excuses like exams and planning exchange (This will be on another post).

This post is a about my entrance for the Historical Sewing Fortnightly #6: Fairytales. I live in Denmark, and was born and raised in Hans Christian Andersen’s birthplace – Odense. So what would fit more than one of his fairytales? I have chosen the fairytale The Emperor’s New Clothes. Mostly because I love it, and have read it several times as a kid and an adult.
The Emperor is a man who only thinks about clothes. One day two new tailors arrives and makes the Emperor believe that what he can not see is the most fantastic clothes in the world. In the end the Emperor takes on this new set clothes and walks through the city. Here is how it ended:

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Source: Vilhelm Pedersen

“… So off went the Emperor in procession under his splendid canopy. Everyone in the streets and the windows said, “Oh, how fine are the Emperor’s new clothes! Don’t they fit him to perfection? And see his long train!” Nobody would confess that he couldn’t see anything, for that would prove him either unfit for his position, or a fool. No costume the Emperor had worn before was ever such a complete success.

“But he hasn’t got anything on,” a little child said.

“Did you ever hear such innocent prattle?” said its father. And one person whispered to another what the child had said, “He hasn’t anything on. A child says he hasn’t anything on.”

“But he hasn’t got anything on!” the whole town cried out at last.

The Emperor shivered, for he suspected they were right. But he thought, “This procession has got to go on.” So he walked more proudly than ever, as his noblemen held high the train that wasn’t there at all.” – The END

The ending of Hans Christian Andersen’s The Emperor’s New Clothes. To read the whole fairtale use this link: The Emperor’s New Clothes

 

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What is it? Victorian Chemise

The Challenge: HSF#6 – Fairytale

Fabric: 100 % pure cotton

Pattern: Laughing Moons #100

Year: 1840 – 1900

Notions: The sides is sewn with french seams. Mainly machine sewn.

How historically accurate is it? I have tried only to use fabric and techniques used in the period. But I might have overlooked something. About 90 %

Hours to complete: 5 hours

First worn: For the photo shoot. Is going to wear it for a late Victorian (1899) event.

Total cost: Lace is ordered from England (about 15 $) and Fabric is bought in Denmark (10 $). 25 $

 

Give-Away! And Hurray for me!

The day has come! Yesterday my facebook site for History Seamstress reached a 100 followers. And what better day to announce a give-away than on my 24th birthday? Yay!

The price is this wonderful book! If you like embroidery or want to learn, this is one of the best book for a start. Actually the whole book series is fantastic!

51luEXDJWhL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_SX385_SY500_CR,0,0,385,500_SH20_OU02_Becky Hogg’s Essential stitch guide for making Blackwork is wonderful! More info here: link

 

How do you enter? 
Go over and like my facebook (link) and write a comment here in the post.

The winner will be announced the 1 of May at 24.00. I will send you a personal mail and ask for your mailing information.

I ship worldwide, so everybody can enter.

All I ask from the winner is a photo of you using or posing with the book, to share on my blog and facebook site.
Good luck!

It is a hard world of studying

One of the less great things about studying is the lack of time to do anything else. These past three months have been so stressful, and at a time literately thought I was going down with the scary folk illness called stress. But thankfully I am not! I started sewing my HSF #3 Challenge back in February. But because of the missing time and missing pleasure of sewing, I haven’t come around to finish it yet.

So NOW! After 1 ½ week of fever and throat pain am I ready to start again! I am only minutes from finishing one of the challenges and close with another one as well. I hope to finish them both on Friday.

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I bought this wonderful book at a book sale for used books. Love it! It is in Danish and tells of the regional Danish rural shirts (men). The time frame is from 1770-1870, but many of techniques can be used for earlier work as well.

HSF #2/2014 – Innovations

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The Challenge: HSF#2/2014 – Innovations
Fabric: Pure white Cotton
Pattern: TV108 – Grand Bustle
Year: 1869-1875
Notions: Plastic covered boning
How historically accurate is it? As far as methode it is very accurate. Didn’t serge the ends mechanically and finished all the details in hand. Such a ruffles .. Oh them ruffles!
Hours to complete: Approximately 12 hours
First worn: Today. Do not know for what Event I will wear this yet.
Total cost: Stash and 30 dollars worth of cotton.

The Innovation:
The theme for this challenge was innovations. I wanted to use minimum 2 innovations in this challenge. The first is the introduction of the sewing machine into private households. The Victorian era, with its massive expansion in industry and technology proved to be the fertile ground from which the sewing machine grew (source). The other innovation is more like a reinvention. The Bustle. This was a further development of the crinoline of the 1850’s and the farthingale from the renaissance (which has a long history I will share with you later!).

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