HSF #17/2014 – Yellow

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The Challenge: Yellow
What is it? A medieval needlecase
Fabric: Embroided on wool, lined with linen and embroided  with silk and cotton
Pattern:
 Selfdrafted with inspiration from archaeological finds and a pattern from Medieval Silkwork
Year:
13th & 14th century Medieval
Notions:
I chose to use cotton thread in some of the colours. Yellow and Green. Mostly because I couldn’t get it in silk and I really wanted to get started. 
How historically accurate is it?
 Apart from the cotton, and the lack of find of fabric needle cases from the medieval period, I guess it pretty close and it is completely done by hand. I would say 60 %.
Hours to complete:
 12 hours
First worn: 
I need to collect some medieval sewing gear before this can be used.
Total cost:
About $10 USD

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m194689_stdInspiration and link to source

More information on brick stiches: 
Medieval Silkwork

Medieval Arts and Crafts

Medieval Threads

More about brick stitches

HSF # 12 – Shape and Support

What the item is: Late Edwardian Corset (1910s)

The Challenge: # 12 – Shape and Support

Fabric: Cotton coutil, Silk ribbon and vintage cotton lace.

Pattern: Nehelenia 1910 Corset Pattern

Year: 1910s

Notions: Polyester thread

How historically accurate is it? Quiet fair. The Pattern is based on a extant corset from the 1910s. I have only used period appropriate techniques. But my polyester thread is  the game killer. So about 90 %

Hours to complete: SO MANY! But to be fair: About 3 hours of cutting, 4 hours of fitting and 10 hours of sewing. So all together about 17 hours in all.

First worn: Only for photos. But I am planning a 1915-16s suit

Total cost: ca. $ 110 USD

 

I must say. I really like this pattern. It is easy to sew and fit. It is so different from an victorian corset. Not tight at all! Fells like getting a big hug.

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HSF #11/2014 – The Politics of Fashion

 

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What is it? Shirtwaist dress
The Challenge: 11 – The Politics of Fashion
Fabric: 100 % Cotton
Pattern: Butterick 2531 (1943)
Year: 1943
Notions: Earlier this year I announced, I was joining up in a Danish WW2 group. This is why i made this dress. The other reason why I wanted this dress is how much I love the clothing of the rural people of all time. So many people is focusing on the middle and upper class in most reenactment societies. One of the reason is that it is more fun to dress up pretty, than dressing down. But in my heart, there is a special place for all those simple folks.
What makes this political? WW2 was a big deal in Europe. So many people suffered in so many ways. I started planning this dress back in January. I knew I wanted it so be as accurate as possible. So I sat down and started thinking. Back in the 40’s people in most of Europe was in short of everything. So i chose to cut my pattern asymmetrical in the skirt, to cut down of fabric use. I wanted this dress to get that feeling. And people loved it at the event. Asked where I bought and telling me how authentic I looked. Just like themselves back ten or their mothers.
How historically accurate is it? Very close!
Hours to complete: 10 hours
First worn: March 24th at a WW2 event called Bunker By Night : link
Total cost: c. 45 $

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HSF #6/2014 – Fairytale

Late as always! And full of bad excuses like exams and planning exchange (This will be on another post).

This post is a about my entrance for the Historical Sewing Fortnightly #6: Fairytales. I live in Denmark, and was born and raised in Hans Christian Andersen’s birthplace – Odense. So what would fit more than one of his fairytales? I have chosen the fairytale The Emperor’s New Clothes. Mostly because I love it, and have read it several times as a kid and an adult.
The Emperor is a man who only thinks about clothes. One day two new tailors arrives and makes the Emperor believe that what he can not see is the most fantastic clothes in the world. In the end the Emperor takes on this new set clothes and walks through the city. Here is how it ended:

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Source: Vilhelm Pedersen

“… So off went the Emperor in procession under his splendid canopy. Everyone in the streets and the windows said, “Oh, how fine are the Emperor’s new clothes! Don’t they fit him to perfection? And see his long train!” Nobody would confess that he couldn’t see anything, for that would prove him either unfit for his position, or a fool. No costume the Emperor had worn before was ever such a complete success.

“But he hasn’t got anything on,” a little child said.

“Did you ever hear such innocent prattle?” said its father. And one person whispered to another what the child had said, “He hasn’t anything on. A child says he hasn’t anything on.”

“But he hasn’t got anything on!” the whole town cried out at last.

The Emperor shivered, for he suspected they were right. But he thought, “This procession has got to go on.” So he walked more proudly than ever, as his noblemen held high the train that wasn’t there at all.” – The END

The ending of Hans Christian Andersen’s The Emperor’s New Clothes. To read the whole fairtale use this link: The Emperor’s New Clothes

 

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What is it? Victorian Chemise

The Challenge: HSF#6 – Fairytale

Fabric: 100 % pure cotton

Pattern: Laughing Moons #100

Year: 1840 – 1900

Notions: The sides is sewn with french seams. Mainly machine sewn.

How historically accurate is it? I have tried only to use fabric and techniques used in the period. But I might have overlooked something. About 90 %

Hours to complete: 5 hours

First worn: For the photo shoot. Is going to wear it for a late Victorian (1899) event.

Total cost: Lace is ordered from England (about 15 $) and Fabric is bought in Denmark (10 $). 25 $

 

HSF #2/2014 – Innovations

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The Challenge: HSF#2/2014 – Innovations
Fabric: Pure white Cotton
Pattern: TV108 – Grand Bustle
Year: 1869-1875
Notions: Plastic covered boning
How historically accurate is it? As far as methode it is very accurate. Didn’t serge the ends mechanically and finished all the details in hand. Such a ruffles .. Oh them ruffles!
Hours to complete: Approximately 12 hours
First worn: Today. Do not know for what Event I will wear this yet.
Total cost: Stash and 30 dollars worth of cotton.

The Innovation:
The theme for this challenge was innovations. I wanted to use minimum 2 innovations in this challenge. The first is the introduction of the sewing machine into private households. The Victorian era, with its massive expansion in industry and technology proved to be the fertile ground from which the sewing machine grew (source). The other innovation is more like a reinvention. The Bustle. This was a further development of the crinoline of the 1850’s and the farthingale from the renaissance (which has a long history I will share with you later!).

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Happy New Sewing Year!

So… 2014 have come around and hopefully i’ll make more this year than last one. I planning to be a part of the HSF’14 and hopes to complete all. I do not think I will do so. But a dream is a dream. The themes is so fare:

HSF’14:

#1 – Make do and Mend

For this challenge am I planning some 1940 kickers and underwear. I have been wanting to do WW2 reenactment for a long time, and finally have I found a group there also uses us women for more than cooking and nursing. In Denmarks Danforce Brigade we learned to use rifles, machineguns and grenades. So I will be doing a lot of 1940 thing this year!

Here is the pattern I will be using. It is from www.veravenus.com

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#2 – Innovations

I have been giving this challenge a lot of thought. But do not know what to make! Give me some ideas!

#3 – Pink

For this will I sew a pink 1940 bra. I have wanted to use a pattern from Jill Salens book “Vintage Lingerie” for a long time now. Now is the chance!

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#4 –   Under it all

Another pattern from Jill Salens boom will be used for this one. No girl in the 1940s could live without a suspenderbelt. And it is also going to be pink!

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#5 – Bodice

For my new 1940 uniform I need a jacket. I have already found a pattern which will only need a few adjustments.

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#6 – Fairytales

I would love to make something related to the Danish author Hans Christian Andersen. But I do not know what in this moment. I need inspiration.

#7 – Tops and Toes

In this challenge will I modify a Chinese parasol to become an 18th century parasol. It is so exiting. First time trying this and the first time making something from this era.

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But for my 1940 Lotte uniform will I also need a shirt, a hat and skirt. So much to do!

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I would also love to make a 18th century wardrobe, and especially a stay.