HSF #17/2014 – Yellow

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The Challenge: Yellow
What is it? A medieval needlecase
Fabric: Embroided on wool, lined with linen and embroided  with silk and cotton
Pattern:
 Selfdrafted with inspiration from archaeological finds and a pattern from Medieval Silkwork
Year:
13th & 14th century Medieval
Notions:
I chose to use cotton thread in some of the colours. Yellow and Green. Mostly because I couldn’t get it in silk and I really wanted to get started. 
How historically accurate is it?
 Apart from the cotton, and the lack of find of fabric needle cases from the medieval period, I guess it pretty close and it is completely done by hand. I would say 60 %.
Hours to complete:
 12 hours
First worn: 
I need to collect some medieval sewing gear before this can be used.
Total cost:
About $10 USD

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m194689_stdInspiration and link to source

More information on brick stiches: 
Medieval Silkwork

Medieval Arts and Crafts

Medieval Threads

More about brick stitches

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HSF #6/2014 – Fairytale

Late as always! And full of bad excuses like exams and planning exchange (This will be on another post).

This post is a about my entrance for the Historical Sewing Fortnightly #6: Fairytales. I live in Denmark, and was born and raised in Hans Christian Andersen’s birthplace – Odense. So what would fit more than one of his fairytales? I have chosen the fairytale The Emperor’s New Clothes. Mostly because I love it, and have read it several times as a kid and an adult.
The Emperor is a man who only thinks about clothes. One day two new tailors arrives and makes the Emperor believe that what he can not see is the most fantastic clothes in the world. In the end the Emperor takes on this new set clothes and walks through the city. Here is how it ended:

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Source: Vilhelm Pedersen

“… So off went the Emperor in procession under his splendid canopy. Everyone in the streets and the windows said, “Oh, how fine are the Emperor’s new clothes! Don’t they fit him to perfection? And see his long train!” Nobody would confess that he couldn’t see anything, for that would prove him either unfit for his position, or a fool. No costume the Emperor had worn before was ever such a complete success.

“But he hasn’t got anything on,” a little child said.

“Did you ever hear such innocent prattle?” said its father. And one person whispered to another what the child had said, “He hasn’t anything on. A child says he hasn’t anything on.”

“But he hasn’t got anything on!” the whole town cried out at last.

The Emperor shivered, for he suspected they were right. But he thought, “This procession has got to go on.” So he walked more proudly than ever, as his noblemen held high the train that wasn’t there at all.” – The END

The ending of Hans Christian Andersen’s The Emperor’s New Clothes. To read the whole fairtale use this link: The Emperor’s New Clothes

 

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What is it? Victorian Chemise

The Challenge: HSF#6 – Fairytale

Fabric: 100 % pure cotton

Pattern: Laughing Moons #100

Year: 1840 – 1900

Notions: The sides is sewn with french seams. Mainly machine sewn.

How historically accurate is it? I have tried only to use fabric and techniques used in the period. But I might have overlooked something. About 90 %

Hours to complete: 5 hours

First worn: For the photo shoot. Is going to wear it for a late Victorian (1899) event.

Total cost: Lace is ordered from England (about 15 $) and Fabric is bought in Denmark (10 $). 25 $

 

Give-Away! And Hurray for me!

The day has come! Yesterday my facebook site for History Seamstress reached a 100 followers. And what better day to announce a give-away than on my 24th birthday? Yay!

The price is this wonderful book! If you like embroidery or want to learn, this is one of the best book for a start. Actually the whole book series is fantastic!

51luEXDJWhL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_SX385_SY500_CR,0,0,385,500_SH20_OU02_Becky Hogg’s Essential stitch guide for making Blackwork is wonderful! More info here: link

 

How do you enter? 
Go over and like my facebook (link) and write a comment here in the post.

The winner will be announced the 1 of May at 24.00. I will send you a personal mail and ask for your mailing information.

I ship worldwide, so everybody can enter.

All I ask from the winner is a photo of you using or posing with the book, to share on my blog and facebook site.
Good luck!

It is a hard world of studying

One of the less great things about studying is the lack of time to do anything else. These past three months have been so stressful, and at a time literately thought I was going down with the scary folk illness called stress. But thankfully I am not! I started sewing my HSF #3 Challenge back in February. But because of the missing time and missing pleasure of sewing, I haven’t come around to finish it yet.

So NOW! After 1 ½ week of fever and throat pain am I ready to start again! I am only minutes from finishing one of the challenges and close with another one as well. I hope to finish them both on Friday.

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I bought this wonderful book at a book sale for used books. Love it! It is in Danish and tells of the regional Danish rural shirts (men). The time frame is from 1770-1870, but many of techniques can be used for earlier work as well.

How to make progress with a project

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Painting by Carla Colsman

It is hard being a full time student at the university, while wanting to be student political active, social, girlfriend-able and crafting. So this is how I come around my projects in the long run.

Small progress is some progress. 

Even though you don’t fell like having time for that garment, because you have a list of chores as well, a little time is enough to fell like your project is moving forward. This is not whole days and hours, but minutes we are talking about. Sit down and sew that one side panel today and continue with the next tomorrow.

Challenge yourself.

I have learned that by challenging myself I look much more forward to that time where I can sit down with my projects. Try a new and harder pattern next time or a new technique.

Make a list

Lists make it easier to overcome a big sewing project. This is helping you knowing what to do and keeping track on how you slowly are moving closer to a finished piece.

Keep a sewing diary.

If you are anything like me, you have a ginormous pile of projects lying in the corner. I therefore find it helpful to keep a diary over my projects so I know where I have come to the next time I pick it up.

Please tell I this post are helpful. I would like to know if you want more of these.